Tag Archives: memory

Reversing the Narrative

This winter my article entitled “Reversing the Narrative of Hillbilly History: A Case Study Using Archaeology at Van Winkle’s Mill in the Arkansas Ozarks” was published in Historical Archaeology 47(3):36–51. The article was a part of a thematic issue co-edited by Paul Shackel and Michael Roller entitled “Reversing the Narrative” which examines the relationships between […]

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The Shepherd of the Hills: The Ozark Narrative that Transformed Branson

“…it all happened in the Ozark Mountains, many miles from what we of the city call civilization.” –Harold Bell Wright (1907:1)  News came out today that a longtime Ozark tradition is taking a final bow.  The Shepherd of the Hills Outdoor Theater in Branson, MO announced it will close on October 19, 2013.  For 54 […]

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Maxine & Me…

This month’s Arkansas Life magazine features an article entitled “Raising the Bar” by Wyndam Weyth about Maxine’s Tap Room in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Maxine’s was my bar of choice in Fayetteville when I was getting my MA there (1995-1999) and again when I returned as an adjunct professor after my Ph.D. at the University of Texas […]

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Music, Unbought Stuffed Dogs, Phil Collins & Ernest Hemingway

This week came more proof of the importance of music to how my mind works….many of you may know that I have no ability to memorize anything…mean anything…I have never been able to memorize addition or subtraction facts, multiplication tables, spellings, dates, or…or anything…I could never memorize prose sections or poetry…If I understand the system […]

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woodduck pot

Hot Springs, Historical Memory, Native Americans & 1920s Masculinity

I am in Hot Springs, Arkansas, this weekend for the state-wide meeting of the Arkansas Archeological Society.  Although I have lived in Arkansas on and off since 1995, I have never really paid that much attention to Hot Springs…that is, until I moved to south Arkansas five years ago.  Although Hot Springs is not in […]

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Coalition for Ozark Living Traditions

Earlier this week I caught wind of a new organization (thanks to Mary B.) called “The Coalition for Ozark Living Traditions” (COLT). According to its mission statement, COLT is a not-for-profit organization established to support individuals and organizations that participate in and support the cultural traditions and traditional arts of the Ozarks region. You can […]

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March 2: Texas Independence Day

My Alma Matter informs me that for more than a century Texas Exes (where ever they may be) have remembered March 2nd (Texas Independence Day) as a time to celebrate both the State and the University of Texas. This observance apparently began with a missed class, a visit to Scholz’s Beer Garden, and a spiked […]

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Claming the Stones Review

By request, I’m posting a recent review I wrote…It was printed in Historical Archaeology 39(4):156-157, 2005. Claiming the Stones, Naming the Bones: Cultural Property and the Negotiation of National and Ethic Identity. Barkan, Elazar and Ronald Bush (editors). Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, 2003. 384 pages, 33 illustrations, index, $50.00 paper. Claiming the Stones/Naming the […]

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The Museum of Ephemerata

After news of John’s successful prospectus defense, I was feeling all nostalgic for Austin, Texas…So I was browsing The Austinist (a website about Austin) and came across a blurb on MachinesMimesis (TM), a walk-thru musical installation event at the Cathedral of Junk held late in January (click on the image for a larger view of […]

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Remembering Slavery…In the Francophone World

France’s President Jacques Chirac has called for the “indelible stain” of slavery to be remembered in a national day of commemoration on May 10, the first of its kind in Europe. I found this interesting as it is a state-acknowledged remembrance in a nation that has not historically endorsed the idea of “race” in official […]

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