Tag Archives: history

Hidden Diversity

I’m happy to report that Historical Archaeology of Arkansas: A Hidden Diversity has just been published by the University of Tennessee Press.  This volume is edited by my friend, former student & colleague Dr. Carl Drexler and I could not be prouder.  The volume had its origins in a pair of conference symposia–one at the […]

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Preserve Arkansas

I’m half-way through my term as President of the Historic Preservation Alliance of Arkansas and one of the biggest transitions for the organization has just happened…pretty quietly.  The Historic Preservation Alliance of Arkansas is now known as simply Preserve Arkansas.  This is a branding change that has been underway for two years–since we did our […]

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Keynote: 2014 Arkansas Historical Association Conference

I am honored to have been chosen to give the Keynote Address at the 2014 Arkansas Historical Association meeting to be held in Historic Washington, Arkansas on April 3-5.  My talk will be entitled “Archeologies of the Home Front: Excavations at Historic Washington State Park” and will talk about the usefulness of historical archeology in […]

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President-elect, Historic Preservation Alliance of Arkansas

At the February Board meeting of the Historic Preservation Alliance of Arkansas, I was voted in as President-elect of the organization. The HPAA is the only statewide nonprofit organization focused on preserving Arkansas’s architectural and cultural resources. Founded in 1981, the Alliance’s mission is to educate, advocate and assist preservation efforts across the state. Through […]

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Google Map image of the block in question showing the solid square roof-lines of the mid-1930s buildings, not the jagged outlines of the 1913 rowhouses joined in the back.

You Can’t Always Trust a Sanborn Map…Just Like Any Other Document…

Last week a colleague of mine sent me a series of texts that she had been to see her old school in Little Rock and they were doing construction.  This construction uncovered a large “tunnel” and she was interested in documenting it.  As there was no section 106 issue (this is a private school), we […]

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What the entire potlid would have looked like.

Bear Grease in the Bear State & The Power of Artifacts in Context

Its that time of year again…I’m getting together stuff for the next Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) meetings…this year they will be Jan 8-12 in Quebec City.  I am revisiting a topic at this year’s conference that I’ve taken a stab at before—a session on the interpretive power of a single artifact in a specific […]

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Professional, Avocational and Public Involvement in Archaeology in Arkansas

** This year I participated in the 2012 “Day of Archaeology” a massive blog-a-polooza wherein over 400 archaeologists blog about their day/discipline on une 29, 2012….below is a crossposting of my blog entry…you can find the original at http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/ ** This year’s “Day of Archaeology” finds me attempting to reorder my life just following the […]

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Music, Unbought Stuffed Dogs, Phil Collins & Ernest Hemingway

This week came more proof of the importance of music to how my mind works….many of you may know that I have no ability to memorize anything…mean anything…I have never been able to memorize addition or subtraction facts, multiplication tables, spellings, dates, or…or anything…I could never memorize prose sections or poetry…If I understand the system […]

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Preliminary Results of the 2011 AAS Summer Training Program at Historic Washington, Arkansas

In other contexts I have said that historical archeology is often about what is no longer there—at least what is no longer visible on the surface of things. This is very much the case with our work this summer in historic Washington, Arkansas. The majority of the past work at Washington has been associated with […]

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The Mysterious Case of the “Social Core” in Texas Anthropology

When I was a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin I, like most other anthropologists interested in the “humanistic” side of anthropology, took what they called “Social Core.” This class, formally entitled “Introduction to Graduate Social Anthropology (ANT 392),” was largely seen as a “trial by fire” which served to separate out […]

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