Tag Archives: anthropology

Maxine & Me…

This month’s Arkansas Life magazine features an article entitled “Raising the Bar” by Wyndam Weyth about Maxine’s Tap Room in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Maxine’s was my bar of choice in Fayetteville when I was getting my MA there (1995-1999) and again when I returned as an adjunct professor after my Ph.D. at the University of Texas […]

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Jamie Brandon screening with volunteer kids and park employees at Historic Washington State Park

Making Historical Archaeology Visible: Community Outreach and Education

If there’s one thing that the controversies surrounding the Diggers and American Digger reality shows have taught us, it’s that the general American public still does not know how to tell the difference between historical archaeologists, and the treasure hunters who are currently on their TV screens.  Furthermore, this lack of public knowledge helps to […]

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Shovels: Regional Diversity in One of Our Most Indispensible Tools

“…the shovel is the trademark of archeology and perhaps its most indispensible tool.”– Heizer A Guide to Archaeological Methods (1949:32) “Lucille, God gave me a gift. I shovel well. I shovel very well.”– The Shoveller, Mystery Men (1999) When I was given the brief to write about archeological tools for ThenDig, my mind reeled.  Like […]

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The Mysterious Case of the “Social Core” in Texas Anthropology

When I was a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin I, like most other anthropologists interested in the “humanistic” side of anthropology, took what they called “Social Core.” This class, formally entitled “Introduction to Graduate Social Anthropology (ANT 392),” was largely seen as a “trial by fire” which served to separate out […]

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Howard Anthropology Under Fire

This month I have received a couple alarming e-mails from my colleagues at Howard University. It appears that Howard University President Sidney A. Ribeau has recently revealed his plans to close the anthropology program in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology–along with other programs such as the B.A. in African Studies, Classics, and Philosophy. This […]

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The History of the SAU Research Station, Part 2

Photographs from 1968 Click on images for a closer look… Old Main Building at Southern State College (now Southern Arkansas University) in 1968. This picture appears to have been taken before Dr. Schambach arrived…perhaps it was taken during a trip to negotiate the establishment of the Arkansas Archeological Survey (AAS) Station (see my previous post). […]

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Cultural Anthropology and Rituals of Exchange

I’ve just read on Savage Minds about the rebirth of the University of Chicago’s anthropology journal Exchange. Exchange is a student-run journal not unlike Text, Practice, Performance from the Américo Paredes Center for Cultural Studies at the University of Texas at Austin (For those of you who are not critical readers, that’s a shameless plug […]

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The History of the SAU Research Station, Part 1

This snippet is from The History of the Arkansas Archeological Survey by Charles R. McGimsey III and Hester A. Davis (1992), page 44… It chronicles the founding of the Arkansas Archeological Survey’s research station at Southern Arkansas University…at least according to Hester Davis. 1968 Meanwhile, Bob was recruiting four other archaeologists and negotiating the contracts […]

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Four Score & Seven Years Ago…

Kudos to Mike Wesch on his stint as a guest blogger on Savage Minds. Particularly entertaining (and right on target) was his last post–criticisms of PowerPoint class lectures (i.e., it locks you into a linear “slide-show” format, it mandates hierarchical bullet points, it promotes “top down” lectures where the professor provides the “key” points, it […]

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Four-Field Anthropology & the Superdisciplinary Approach

Nancy over at Savage Minds has followed up on an earlier post regarding her frustration with the four-field approach to “Introduction to Anthropology” courses (see my post on “Must I Side With or Against My Section?” for a bit about tensions between our subdisciplines). At any rate, Nancy has found a way to make the […]

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